A review of The Oracle Year by Charles Soule

Huge thank you to Harper Perennial for providing me a copy of The Oracle Year in exchange for an honest review.

As a fan of David Wong, I knew The Oracle Year by Charles Soule would be a great fit for me.  It sounded like a adventure full of questions and bizarre situations and it did not disappoint. The Oracle Year tells the story of Will Dando, a bassist living in New York City, after he wakes up with exactly 108 predictions in his head. Will, with the help of his friend, sets up a site where he can publish these predictions and make more money than he thought possible. Unfortunately, with the power Will has been given he ends up making a lot of enemies. Among them: the president of the United States, a nationally renowned televangelist, and a warlord with a live nuclear bomb.

As the world is falling apart around him, Will learns he is the only person who can put it back together. Enlisting the few people he can trust, Will’s journey takes him on an adventure that spans the globe while taking the reader on a really wild ride.

I think my favorite part of this novel is the idea that a person considered to be a “nobody” is entrusted with power on such a large scale. I also love the specificity of the predictions he receives. Starting with the number, to some of predictions themselves, Soule really created an interesting web of predictions. I like how Soule weaved everything together from beginning to end. Nothing mentioned in the beginning was not left out from later in the novel. It showed me that Soule gave great care to the world he created and didn’t want to leave a single thread hanging.

Of course, that is, for the biggest thread there is. There are many questions in this book that are answered, but there is one that isn’t. I won’t say which one so as not to spoil the novel for anyone interested in reading it, but it definitely left me wondering. That being said, I don’t think the big question not being answered detracted from the novel at all. The Oracle Year is about Will’s journey and what Will did with the knowledge he received. I cared more about that than the logistics or science behind the story.

Another thing that was great about this novel was the humor. Soule was great a bringing humor to the novel in a great way – through his characters. The humor was not too much or barely there. Soule was masterful about the way he incorporated funny remarks or actions from his characters. He created a serious novel with humorous undertones and that is hard to do.

My only complaint is that the beginning is a little slow. It took me some time to get into the novel and actually want to dive headfirst into Will’s world. It’s the only thing I wish was different.

Overall, The Oracle Year gets three and a half out of five stars from me! It was funny, intriguing, and a really interesting take on the ideas of power and faith.

Make sure you get your hands on this book when it comes out on April 3! 

Stacks on deck: My March to-be-read pile

After a very YA heavy February (I was slumping and needed some easy reads to push my through my slump), I decided to focus on some adult fiction this month.

The star of March is definitely The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. I have heard nothing but good things about this book and, even though it scares me, I’m going to dive into it headfirst. Not only have I heard great things from friends about it (bookstagram friends, work friends, etc.), but the amazing Lin-Manuel Miranda is executive producing a TV series for it. Once I heard that I knew I had to read the books before it aired. I’m hoping to get started on it this week when I take the train to Chicago and have plenty of uninterrupted reading time.

My current read for March is The Oracle Year by Charles Soule. I was graciously sent a copy by Harper Perennial in exchange for an honest review. According to Harper Perennial, The Oracle Year is for fans of Joe Hill, David Wong, and other humorous sci-fi/fantasy writers. This novel follows Will Dando, a twenty-something bassist living in New York City, after he wakes up with 108 predictions in his head. Will, with the help of a close friend, takes these predictions and monetizes them becoming the most famous, most loved, and most hated person in the world. I’m about halfway through and loving every minute of it. It’s funny, it’s intriguing, and most of all it’s incredibly well written.

If you’re interested in this book, look for it at your local bookstore on April 3!

PS. It looks like The Oracle Year is being made into a TV show too!

Another book I’m really looking forward to this month is The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah. Kristin Hannah’s books seem to be big hits with a lot of people and The Great Alone is not exception. I’ve been seeing multiple five-star reviews for this book all over bookstagram and Goodreads which makes me so excited to dive into this one. Another great thing about reading this book this month is that I will be reading it with some great people on bookstagram! While I’ve been impatient with buddy reads in the past, I think this book will be great to discuss with friends.

The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller also made my March hopeful pile this year. I’m reading it in anticipation for Circe because I really want to get a feel for the author’s writing and her take on Greek mythology. It also helps that I am a huge fan of Greek mythology and any modern take on it really interests me.

Finally, the book I think I’m going to finish out the month with is The House of Impossible Beauties by Joseph Cassara. There are so many reasons I hope that I will love this book. The biggest one being that one of my best book friends gave this book a solid five-star review. I really respect her reviews and seeing her thoughts on this book made me want to read it even more. I cannot wait to get into this book, but I really want to end March on a strong note and I think this book will be that for me.

That’s my March to-be-read pile! It might change a bit because I picked from great books from Book of the Month this month and might dive into those. What are you planning to read this month?